Reduce the "time to experience" of your technical workforce
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Aging Workforce? Operator Training?
Employee Recruitment & Retention?
Proficiency Management? Talent Gap?

Tuesday, December 11, 2012
11:55 a.m. — 1:00 p.m.
 

In the search for improved profitability, industrial companies know that the game is won or lost each day on the front lines with highly skilled, experienced operations teams. Inexperienced and undertrained operators can be a liability, risking the safety of plant personnel and bottom line profitability. An aging workforce is becoming a significant issue and companies are competing to recruit the best talent and efficient methods to transfer valuable skill sets.

Fortunately the science of human performance management, education, and industrial technologies have converged in a solution that can dramatically improve workforce performance and reduce the "time to experience" of your most valued assets.

Join us on December 11, 2012 as Alastair Fraser, Vice President Operator Training Simulation at Invensys, explains a new strategy that dramatically reduces the "time to experience" of your technical workforce.

What we'll cover:

Where: Monument Inn Restaurant, 4406 Independence Parkway South, LaPorte, TX 77571

Who should attend: Executives, Plant Managers, Directors, Operations Managers, Human Resource Managers, Training Managers, Engineering Managers

Register now to reserve your seat.









Guest Speaker

Alastair Fraser
Alastair Fraser

Alastair Fraser, Invensys Vice President, Operator Training Simulation & Compliance Services: Alastair has over 30 years of experience in the process industries and simulation. He joined Simulation Sciences as a Technical Consultant for UK/EMEA operations in 1987 and over the past 25 years and has worked in operations, support, sales, marketing and strategic management roles including as VP/GM for Invensys SimSci-Esscor. Prior to Invensys, Mr. Fraser worked in the UK refining industry and for the Industrial Division of Proctor & Gamble. Mr. Fraser received his Chemical Engineering degree from the University of Cambridge, UK.